Maritime Team Dynamics - 'Lessons from the Flight Deck'

SKU:
BP105419
£20.00
(1 review)
Number of Pages:
132
Book Height:
235 mm
Book Width:
155 mm
Weight:
0.5 kg
Published Date:
September 2021
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The maritime and aviation industries operate in vastly different environments, but share some key similarities. This publication analyses 12 incidents in both sectors, identifying common themes that led to each incident, in order to share knowledge and improve overall operational safety in the maritime industry. It demonstrates the importance of effective teamwork in maintaining safety throughout shipboard operations and forms a valuable resource for seafarers of all ranks and for those ashore.

In 2017, aviation had its safest year on record. For the first time in 60 years, there were no fatalities on a commercial airline. While the maritime industry is very different from aviation in many respects, there may be lessons worth learning from an industry with such an excellent safety record. Aviation has benefited from decades of research into the areas of risk management that others in the transport industry can learn from.

In the maritime industry, we see the same incidents happening repeatedly. For the crew members involved, and their families, these often tragic and avoidable incidents can be life changing. For ship owners and operators, the financial impact of claims can be significant, in addition to the disruption and inconvenience caused by accidents on board.

While it is easy to dismiss any transport incident as being caused by ‘human error’, the aviation industry has adopted the philosophy that the human element can be improved by taking a ‘process oriented’ approach to managing the human element. This Guide aims to show how the human element management techniques and principles used in aviation can be applied throughout the maritime industry.

Introduced by the UK P&I Club to boost member access to top-class safety training, this publication refers to the Club’s interactive maritime crew resource management (MCRM) course: a human element safety initiative that brings aviation and maritime together to provide members with exceptional human factor learning and instruction.

Knowledge sharing between the maritime and aviation industries is a key element of improving safety globally. This publication contains 12 aviation incidents that cross-refer to the maritime sector, highlighting important and transferable ‘lessons from the flight deck’. A discussion of these lessons follows each case study, emphasising important teamwork practices such as clear communication, situational awareness and the need for a shared mental model between all members of the bridge team.

The case studies provide lessons to be learnt from the aviation industry, showing how they mirror maritime incidents and focussing on the key human element modules included within the MCRM training. Each case study refers to the MRCM course structure.

Number of Pages:
132
ISBN:
9781856099776
Book Height:
235 mm
Book Width:
155 mm
Weight:
0.5 kg
Author:

UK P&I Club

Publication Date:
September 2021
Published Date:
September 2021

Reviews

  • 5
    From Sky to Sea

    We in shipping are often told or have thought that we should spend more time ‘learning from aviation’. This is a noble and interesting concept – but the two industries have significant differences which means that direct translation is not always applicable. Moreover, it is very difficult to find professionals with knowledge of both shipping and aviation who can intelligently identify where lessons can be learned. We are in luck! The shipping professionals at the UK P&I Club have collaborated with the aviation professionals at aviation training specialist CAE to produce the publication Maritime Team Dynamics – Lessons from the Flight Deck. Now you can argue that aviation is very different from shipping, different technology, training, culture, work/life balance, etc…but this book focuses on the Human Element and how that affects the way that professionals make decisions, particularly in challenging times. It seems that this is an area where mariners and pilots are similar (they areboth human) and that we (in shipping) can learn lessons from the flight deck. This useful and enjoyable ‘handbook’ contains only 12 case studies, each of which can be read, digested and discussed independently with no loss of continuity. How useful would it be to expose your crews to an aviation industry incident and challenge them to identify the lessons learned for shipping? The book’s authors do this as well. Making use of their extraordinary understanding of the shipping environment, the authors follow each aviation incident and lessons learned with a breakdown of how these lessons might translate to shipping – often with real life examples from the shipping world. So often it is easy for one industry to preach to another but the value of CAE is that they teach in both sectors so are ideally situated to offer practical and valuable insights on both. A sample chapter looking at the effects and challenges of fatigue follows overleaf, to give an idea of the structure of the book and how it conveys its message – as well as being a good and valuable read in its own right. This book offers the best and easiest path for the average mariner to learn from aviation that I have seen. Subjects covered in the case studies include: Crew Resource Management; motor memory; checklists; use of electronic aids; situational awareness and expectation bias; stress as a distractor; when the plan changes and; we have always done it that way, among others. Do any of these sound familiar? As so often, using case studies from other industries allows our team to think laterally about our own industry. Highly recommended! David Patraiko FNI - Seaways February 2022 Edition.